How can we argue that physios be part of the solution in primary care when they are in shortage?

This is the heart of the question posed by David Oliver on Twitter.

1 in 5 GP appointments is MSK related. Using a senior physiotherapist to deal with such cases can save GPs time and save money on needless diagnostics. David’s challenge is, given there are clear shortages of physios, should the CSP argue that physio can relieve pressures in other areas such as general practice?

This is just a quick exposition of the narrative and thought process, rather than an evidenced paper, so please read it as such.

The CSP is clear; there is a shortage of qualified physiotherapists. Fear of oversupply and low levels of funding for HEIs in past years have meant not enough new graduates have been joining the profession. CSP members, both managers and union reps, are reporting problems recruiting at entry-level physiotherapists (Band 5) right across the country.

The CSP’s workforce model, http://www.csp.org.uk/professional-union/practice/evidence-base/workforce-data-model suggests we need at least extra 500 physios graduating each year to meet existing population demand. Add to this the challenges faced by overseas-qualified physios; tougher visa restrictions and the uncertainty over Brexit, and the future may look bleak.

We were fully aware of this context when we started campaigning on extending physiotherapy in primary and community care. So how do we square the circle?

The environment is not as bleak as it at first appears. Firstly, some of the solutions the CSP is calling for do not require any more staff. Self-referral to physiotherapy changes how patients access local service, not the level of patient demand. What it does do is relieve pressure on GPs by cutting out needless appointments. Equally, moving more physiotherapy and rehab services from acute to community or primary settings changes where the service is provided, not the number of physios needed to provide the service.

Secondly, in the specific case of general practice physiotherapists, they are not drawn from the ranks of the newly qualified. First contact physiotherapists are typically Band 7 or 8 senior practitioners, with advanced practice skills. There are physiotherapist ready and able to step up into these roles. The challenge may be to backfill their old roles rather than filling the new general practice roles.

Thirdly, there is scope for trained physios who are not currently working in physiotherapy to be tempted back into the profession. Despite under supply of graduates we have seen growth in the HCPC physio register. We suspect more returners and fewer people taking shorter career breaks are part of the reason. Paul Chapman at HEE is doing excellent work promoting return to practice https://twitter.com/PaulChapman09/status/851770370868875264 .

Fourth,  there is likely to be an expansion of physiotherapy training over the next few years. Physiotherapy courses have long been oversubscribed with high quality candidates. The CSP supported the changes to bursaries and lobbied successfully for higher level funding for physio courses. We expect to see more universities opening physiotherapy courses and existing courses expanding. We know that practice based learning opportunities (placements) could be a blockage, so we are working to get more of our members to take students. Add to this the development of “earn while you learn” degree apprenticeships, and we can start to see that a better supply of newly qualified physios in the next few years. Given that it is quicker to train a physio than a doctor, this means that physiotherapy can become more of a solution over time.

Finally, expanding the support workforce in physiotherapy offers a way to manage some pressure within physiotherapy. Support staff – physiothepy assistants, rehab assistants, exercise instructors etc – have long played an important part in physiotherapy services. With training and supervision, they undertake many of the routine activities newly qualified physios might perform. In many cases, physio support staff develop expertise and high levels of skill that go well beyond this.

In a number of services we are now seeing the recruitment of qualified, but not in physiotherapy, staff a part of the support team e.g. sports theorists and sports rehabilitators. They are not physios. They are not regulated and have different training, but operating under clinical direction they can add capacity where newly qualified physiotherapists are in short supply. This frees up registered physios for work only they can do, in the same way physio can undertake work that both they and GPs can do.

So, whilst the message may feel contraintuitive,  it is coherent to say both that we need more physios and that physiothepy can relieve pressure on GPs.

 

 

Why is the CSP putting effort into engaging members in Guernsey?

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) is the professional and trade union body for physiotherapists, physio students and physiotherapy staff across the UK, Channel Islands and Isle of Man. We have 56,000 members and represent over 90% of qualified physiotherapists across the UK and Crown Dependencies.

We have around 50 members currently in the Bailiwick of Guernsey, plus some UK based members who are from Guernsey. Guernsey accounts for under 0.1% of our membership. Given this fact, our Guernsey members would, in the past, have been welcome but largely ignored part of the CSP family. Times have changed at the CSP.

We are undertaking a very deliberate attempt to engage our members on the islands. We surveyed them last year to find out what they thought of the CSP and what their concerns about physiotherapy in Guernsey were. We also used the States elections to engage with local politicians. Later this month we are running a member event in St Peter Port and meeting local services and stakeholders. But why put so much effort into such a tiny proportion of our membership? The answer lies in our corporate strategy.

We recognised that, like many membership bodies, there is a sense that we are HQ centric. I deliberately don’t use the term London centric, even though our HQ in in the Capital. Our London members can feel as remote from the HQ as those in Orkney. We also know that the whole basis for panning and providing health and social care is more decentralised than ever. Our response has been to start a strategic shift to organise our members in their communities and workplaces. This gives us the best chance of exerting local influence, supporting members and of demonstrating that we are alongside our members wherever they live, work or study.

As part of our countries, regions and localities works (CRL for short) we have moved some professional support staff into our Scottish and Welsh offices. We have created new union organising posts and a new regional engagement and campaigns team. We are trailing virtual regional staff teams. But the common focus of these changes has been to start to enable our members to do more for themselves locally, supported by staff. Which takes me back to Guernsey.

It is symbolic of our commitment to be alongside our members, wherever they are, that we have chosen Guernsey. A small group of members, living on an island, which is not even part of the UK, is about as far removed from an Anglo-centric, NHS, Whitehall focus as we could get. Guernsey is also a great place for us to test whether the approach is more than just our staff working differently with our existing active members.

On paper we still have Guernsey branch, although it has not been active for several years. But if anywhere can reinvent how the CSP operates as both a peer to peer support network and to influence for patients and the profession it should be Guernsey.  Guernsey is small enough for pretty much everyone in the physiotherapy community to know each other. It has a history of local activism. There is a willingness to be involved and a desire to do this is less formal and more modern ways. It also has clear, if unique, political and administrative decision makers to influence. This means it is a perfect place to test what we hope will work as an approach in other places.

So watch this space for updates. If engaging members in Guernsey and encouraging them to find new ways of networking and getting active works it may be coming to a community near you.

It would be great to hear from other organisations trying a more local approaches and also from CSP members about your reflections on how we can help you promoted physiotherapy and support your fellow members locally.

Insight for membership organisations

Why does knowing what members think matter? The simple answer is that without evidence of what members actually think we might make the wrong decisions. A classic example is the future of the CSP member magazine – Frontline.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy has over 56,000 members. We are a member led organisation. But, only a small number of members can get involved in our elected Council, Country Boards and committees. So how do we find out what our members think, want and need?

Part of the answer is through structured market research. We have used member surveys and focus groups to understand our members. Some research related to specific services or issues; for example, what members want from their member magazine or the destination of new physiotherapy graduates.

Other exercises research specific member segments. For some years we’ve had a rolling programme of both surveys and focus groups covering student members, newly qualified members, overseas trained members, longer standing members and associate members. Each group was researched every few years, largely to inform our membership recruitment and retention work.

We have also run an annual large-scale member perception survey. This is sent to a representative sample of at least 10,000 members. This was used to help our Council judge our performance. Together these exercises provided a patchwork quilt of insight into our members.

This year, we ran a major exercise using external contractors to understand all our member segments at one time. This involved in depth telephone interviews with 65 members. They were representative of all types of member, of different levels of involvement and included members from all countries and regions. The qualitative results informed the design of a large-scale market research survey.

Over 1000 usable responses were received to a survey sent to a stratified sample of members. The survey is likely to by 99% accurate for results to a plus or minus 4% margin of error. Together the qualitative and quantitative work give us a greater degree of certainty about what our members actually think about the CSP.

The research tells us a lot about how members want to communicate with us. Channel use and preferences are things we have tested regularly before. This year’s more comprehensive exercise gives us more of a sense of how key communications fit into members views of the broader package of member benefits. Our magazine, Frontline, is rated as one of our top three member benefits.

Most members read Frontline, but even if they don’t many more like receiving it as a reminder of their belonging to the Society. They see it as almost a luxury item in some cases. We have now learnt that it is also their main source of information on our campaigns. In contrast, only 6% of members choose to engage with the CSP via Twitter. This is perhaps surprising given our relatively young average age.

These insights are critical to making the right decisions. Periodically colleagues have suggested we save money by moving to a digital only version of Frontline. Members of our Marketing & Communications Committee have sometimes suggested changing the focus or tone. Our annual reps conference this year even discussed moving to an opt-in requirement to get the magazine at all.

If we did not ask our members what they thought, we might have concluded these were good options and that members would be happy with change. However, the research suggests this would be a big mistake. The silent majority of members want Frontline and want it in hard copy. Most read it and most think it is right for them. So the insight has helped us avoid making a mistake, which would have damaged our relationship with our members.

We are still digesting the 90 pages of our latest insight report. But the initial learning is fascinating. Some of the data confirms what we thought, but some is surprising. Asked to personify the CSP now we were described as; male, young enough to be active but old enough to be knowledgeable and smart. Being described as male was a surprise for us.

Over 70% of our members are women. Our Chair and CEO are women. Most of our Council and Leadership Team are women. However, respondents told the researchers that the face of the CSP for them, is their workplace rep. Men are probably disproportionately represented amongst our stewards. This probably explains this perception. It certainly gives us something to think about.

The research also gives us a wealth of information about why members join and what they want from us. Our suspicion that our members are deeply tribal has proved to be accurate. Many join the CSP because it is the “done thing” amongst physios and physio support staff. Building on this sense of belonging, to enhance engagement, is clearly an area we need to work on.

Equally, we  knew that our core services are highly valued. PLI cover, employment (union) advice and support for career development are all important to our members. However, they are not always sure what the full range of benefits is or how to access them. Some thinking is clearly needed about whether the offer is overly complex or needs communicating differently.

I am told the CSP is unusual amongst professional bodies and unions for our focus on insight. Although we may feel we are good at collecting insight I am not sure we are always so good at using it to inform decisions. This is largely due to it not being shared and discussed widely enough. So, we are looking at how we repackage the data into more easily digested chunks to assist our Council, and colleagues across the organisation, in their decision making and planning.

Insight is never completed because the more you learn about members the more you realise what you don’t know. We plan to review our annual survey and rolling insight programme in light of the new work. There are opportunities to refocus and build on the more sophisticated ways of recording insight we have used this year. For example moving from simple overall perception scores to graduated rating of; engagement, customer experience and sense of value for benefits. It would be great to share ideas with similar organisations.

What has been the experience of other membership bodies of gathering insight?

Frontline magazine

Frontline, http://www.csp.org.uk/news-events/frontline-magazine is the CSP member magazine.

How popular is Frontline?

The last annual member survey found that 64% of respondents rated Frontline as useful and that  52% prefer to get information via Frontline, compared to 32% by e-bulletin or 6% for Twitter. 59% thought the magazine had improved thanks to design and content changes made during 2015.

Why is Frontline automatically sent as a hard copy?

Members have told us they feel that the hard copy format makes it stand out from the electronic communications they receive. Members can opt out of receiving Frontline as a hard copy, but most do not.

Why isn’t Frontline a digital magazine?

Frontline is available in both digital and hard copy formats. News items are available online before the hard copy is distributed. Our communications approach is to offer a range of different channels of communication. This is because all the evidence we have suggests that no single approach will be right for the majority if our members. Providing information across more channels means we reach a greater number of our members.

Why is Frontline published 21 times a year?

We do review this annually. When we last asked members 56% said roughly two-weekly is about right.

Even with the current frequency we can’t cover everything suggested. If we reduce frequency we might have to more strictly focus content on CSP priority campaigns and advice, which would mean less member suggested content.

Experience from other publications  suggest that as frequency falls recognition of the information provided falls disproportionately.

Our advertisers find the frequency of Frontline a positive. It allows relatively swift inclusion and the opportunity of regular multiple adverts.

How does the CSP test Frontline with readers?

We use a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. We ask questions about member communications preferences and views in our annual member survey. We have run regular focus groups for specific member segments over the last few years and have asked about their views on Frontline in those focus groups. In addition, when we reviewed Frontline, we ran additional focus groups to test views in more depth and to test alternative formats.

We  welcome direct member feedback via frontline@csp.org.uk

What has the insight told you?

There is high awareness of the magazine amongst members. It is one of the most used sources of CSP information. Members feel that the hard copy format makes it stand out from the mainly electronic communications they receive. They prefer a less formal tone.

Most members look at the cover or flick through the magazine to find content of interest – they read it quickly at work or at home. The most read sections are ‘Comment, ‘News’ and ‘Networks and Networking’. Members are generally most interested in reading about:

  • What others in the profession are doing
  • Clinical/professional developments
  • How physiotherapists reach unusual or interesting positions
  • Anything that has human interest, ‘a feel good factor’, humour or is inspirational
  • How the CSP responds to the big national health/physio issues in the news
  • What the CSP is doing to support members and promote the profession.

Members working in the private sector are least interested in reading anything presented as union news.Prior to changes the magazine was perceived as being written predominantly for established NHS physiotherapists.

What have you done as a result?

We redesigned the magazine and changed our editorial approach. We now have a policy of deliberately seeking to cover a wider range of members; from across all corners of the British Isles, in all sectors and in all stages of their career. We have introduced a range of new regular features, for example on awards and research findings. We have also tried to get away from artificial “union” and “professional” distinctions in stories and instead aim to reflect the holistic experience members have at work or in business.

We have also developed alternative ways of reaching some of the groups who read Frontline less. We have introduced bespoke e-bulletins for students, associates and newly qualified members.

Why isn’t there more scientific content?

Physiotherapy www.csp.org.uk/journal is the official CSP scientific journal. Frontline fills a different role, covering a wider range of issues in a more accessible style. This does include clinical content and the promotion of journal content. Research amongst members suggested that they want Frontline to be more about “translating” research and signposting clinical issues.

What input do qualified physiotherapists have into the content?

We commission many articles directly from physiotherapists. Any member can suggest articles to the Editor via frontline@csp.org.uk.

Where non-physiotherapists write articles with clinical aspects, they are expected to verify the content with a specialist member or one of the CSP in house physiotherapists.

Why does Frontline carry advertising for services or products which some people regard as not representing best practice?

Adverts are an important source of income for the CSP. Whilst the content is the responsibility of the advertisers and the inclusion of adverts in no way represents an endorsement by the CSP, all advertisements are accepted in good faith according to the Code of Advertising Practice as laid out by the Advertising Standards Authority.

It is part of professional responsibility of every physiotherapist to critically appraise services and offers. The CSP can’t do this for members, especially when there is legitimate debate within the profession on some modalities.

How much does Frontline cost?

The net budgeted costs in 2016 were £562,000. This is made up mainly of postage and print costs, less advertising and sales income. It does not include staff costs as the staff involved work across a range of channels.

Can I opt out and save money?

You can opt out of receiving the hard copy and rely on the online version, however we can’t offer a discount for this. Any individual member may use some CSP services more than others, or different services at different times. We can’t offer both a comprehensive range of services and be financially sustainable on an “a la carte” basis.

Does not taking the print copy reduce costs for the CSP?

It does save on postage but most production costs are fixed regardless of the number we print and printing is not priced by individual copy.

Transforming healthcare through marginal changes

At the moment there is lots of talk about transformation, systems thinking and strategy across health and social care.

Recently I was helping a friend who was preparing for a job interview. My friend was anxious because the role was to provide strategic direction to a big transformation programme in social care. Although they had already done a very similar role they doubted their ability to think strategically. The conversation went something like this:

Friend – I’m not sure that I can show that I am strategic

Me – Why do you say that?

Friend- Well, I am good at bringing people together, identifying problems and finding practical solutions but not at having big ideas

Me – So do you have a clear sense of where you want to organisation to get to?

Friend – Yes

Me – Do you have a sense of how to get there?

Friend – Yes, but it is about getting our people to make lots of smaller changes which move us in that direction, not one big change

Me – Do you have a sense of how you can get them to do that?

Friend – Yes, it is change management and using their knowledge and enthusiasm to improve things for their service users

Me – That sounds like a strategy to me.

This is not a unique conversation. I have met many bright and articulate people who feel daunted by either the strategy word or transformation. Sometimes this is because they have seen their organisations parachute in experts who say their strategy of one big change will revolutionise things. Certainly for some services or organisations a big strategic shift, for example from face to face to online services, can be transformative. However, in most organisations there isn’t going to be a single big game changer, or the big project will only deliver part of the strategic shift needed.

At its simplest strategic change is “just” setting clear ambitions, and inviting appropriate actions to move the organisation in that direction. I am great advocate for the Dave Brailsford strategy of making multiple small improvements across a business as or system.

Brailsford https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Brailsford is the man credited with transforming the performance of British cycling. Under his direction the GB and now Team SKY have become dominant in the world of cycling. His approach is to look for many marginal improvements which add up to a big improvement overall. A 1% improvement on 100 things can be the equivalent to 100% improvement in one.

It is not surprising that some of our top leaders in the world of health (Simon Stevens and Jim Mackey for example) are talking about system transformation coming through local actions. Enabling change at team, ward or service level is going to be the key to change in the NHS and social care. Who better than frontline staff and their patients to say what can be done better, faster or more cheaply?

However, just as having a big idea does not guarantee change nor does exalting people to make local changes. Marginal gains will only make system level change if they are supported with wider change, which is where they become strategic in my view. So what is needed to achieve change through marginal improvement?

* Cultural change – For marginal improvement to flourish there needs to be a shift in culture. Too often health and care are characterised by professional hierarchies and approvals mechanisms. We need to empower the frontline to self-manage change in their own area.

* Better communication – We need to share new ideas more quickly between and across organisations. It is no good a great but simple idea being used in one team in one trust in one town. Sharing simple ideas needs to be as common as sharing the results of large scale clinical research. The Vanguards are trying to encourage this as are initiatives such as http://www.fabnhsstuff.net/ and social media communities such as @Physiotalk.

* Time – In all organisations there can be a tendency to see time spent thinking about change as “not proper work”. This is particularly true in healthcare where patient contact is seen by most clinicians as their main role. Unfortunately this is reinforced by some of the initiatives intended to transform the NHS. Productivity schemes which classify non-patient contact time as non-productive won’t help harness the knowledge of frontline staff to make change. So we need to build time to develop improvements and evaluate new activities into the concept of productive time.

Talking to my friend many of these are issues sound common to social care too. They have a pretty clear vision for how she can engage colleagues to make their own service changes. So I had no qualms in reassuring her she is a strategic thinker. Oh, and they got the job.

What do you think we need to do to harness the power of marginal improvements in health and social care?

#BackingRehab – London

What is the CSP interest in the GLA?

The CSP is the professional body and union for physiotherapists and support staff. We have over 7000 members in London.

What is rehab?

Rehabilitation is an essential part of healthcare, following surgery, illness or injury, and aims to optimise function and wellbeing. Rehabilitation works by helping people get back to daily activities, return to work and enjoy their leisure. Community rehabilitation when provided leads to:

✔   shorter length of stay in hospital (good for the patient and taxpayer)

✔   improved mobility

✔   increased activity levels

✔   significantly improved quality of life.

Physio rehab helps treat a wide range of conditions:

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) -Rapid access to musculoskeletal physiotherapists can reduce the amount of time people are off sick and is vital in preventing a new acute problem becoming chronic and long lasting.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) – CVD includes conditions such as angina, heart attack and stroke. Up to 90 per cent of the risk of a first heart attack is due to nine lifestyle factors that can be changed. Physiotherapy-led cardiac rehab programmes are clinically effective in reducing mortality, improving health and quality of life, reducing length of hospital stays and reducing the number of hospital readmissions.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – COPD is an umbrella term for a group of lung diseases that include chronic bronchitis, emphysema and small airways disease. Pulmonary rehab programmes are clinically effective and cost effective in improving health and quality of life, reducing length of hospital stay and reducing the number of hospital readmissions for people with COPD.

Stroke – Approximately one-third of stroke survivors are left with disability and rehabilitation needs. Emerging evidence shows that physio rehab very early after stroke (ie, mobilisation within 24 hours) and at high intensity leads to better outcomes and is cost effective. A minimum of 45 minutes of physiotherapy for five days a week is recommended.

Falls – One in three people aged over 65 will fall every year equating to more than three million falls per year. Half of people who fall will fall again in the next 12 months. In the UK physio-led group exercise programmes have been shown to be effective and to reduce falls by 29 per cent and the risk of falling by 15 per cent – and individual exercise programmes by 32 per cent and 22 per cent respectively.

As more people survive serious accidents there is a growing need for rehabilitation physiotherapy. London’s NHS may already be struggling to cope with increased rehabilitation demands as a result of the success of major trauma centres. Robert Bentley, director of trauma at King’s College Hospital has expressed concern that there are insufficient community rehabilitation facilities in London.

Be part of the campaign

The CSP is encouraging candidates to get behind local rehabilitation services. There are a number of ways that the Mayor and Assembly can act to support quality rehab. In supporting the #backingrehab campaign, candidates are committing to take action if elected such as:

  • Visiting a local service and meeting staff and patients
  • Meeting with patient groups
  • Asking London’s health commissioners to ensure adequate rehab services.

All candidates who sign up to support #backingrehab will receive further information on the value of rehabilitation.

Candidates on twitter will receive a retweet for tweeting ‘I’m #backingrehab’ in support.

 

#BackingRehab – Guernsey

Thanks to the candidates in the States election who replied via Twitter to the invitation to support the #backingrehab initiative. This post is intended to answer some of the queries raised.

What is the CSP interest in Guernsey?

The CSP is the professional body for physiotherapists in Guernsey. We have well over 100 members in the Bailiwick.

What is the situation in Guernsey?

HSSD’s Future 2020 Vision states that plans are to be developed in the following areas where physiothepy can help rehabilitate people:

  • Stroke
  • Disability
  • Respiratory disorders.

However, the Vision does not cover other areas where rehabilitation would be beneficial and has only one reference to rehabilitation, and that is in the context of providing  health services to non-residents. It also highlights that in 2017 funding agreements with physiotherapy providers are to be renegotiated.

It is therefore an appropriate time for those wishing to seek election to ask questions about rehab in Guernsey.

What is rehab?

Rehabilitation is an essential part of healthcare, following surgery, illness or injury, and aims to optimise function and wellbeing. Rehabilitation works by helping people get back to daily activities, return to work and enjoy their leisure. Community rehabilitation when provided leads to:

✔   shorter length of stay in hospital (good for the patient and taxpayer)

✔   improved mobility

✔   increased activity levels

✔   significantly improved quality of life.

Physio rehab helps treat a wide range of conditions:

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) -Rapid access to musculoskeletal physiotherapists can reduce the amount of time people are off sick and is vital in preventing a new acute problem becoming chronic and long lasting.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) – CVD includes conditions such as angina, heart attack and stroke. Up to 90 per cent of the risk of a first heart attack is due to nine lifestyle factors that can be changed. Physiotherapy-led cardiac rehab programmes are clinically effective in reducing mortality, improving health and quality of life, reducing length of hospital stays and reducing the number of hospital readmissions.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – COPD is an umbrella term for a group of lung diseases that include chronic bronchitis, emphysema and small airways disease. Pulmonary rehab programmes are clinically effective and cost effective in improving health and quality of life, reducing length of hospital stay and reducing the number of hospital readmissions for people with COPD.

Stroke – Approximately one-third of stroke survivors are left with disability and rehabilitation needs. Emerging evidence shows that physio rehab very early after stroke (ie, mobilisation within 24 hours) and at high intensity leads to better outcomes and is cost effective. A minimum of 45 minutes of physiotherapy for five days a week is recommended.

Falls – One in three people aged over 65 will fall every year equating to more than three million falls per year. Half of people who fall will fall again in the next 12 months. In the UK physio-led group exercise programmes have been shown to be effective and to reduce falls by 29 per cent and the risk of falling by 15 per cent – and individual exercise programmes by 32 per cent and 22 per cent respectively.

Note: figures are based on UK studies but are likely to be similar in Guernsey.

Be part of the campaign

The CSP is encouraging candidates to get behind local rehabilitation services. There are a number of ways that Deputies can act to support quality rehab. In supporting the #backingrehab campaign, candidates are committing to take action if elected such as:

  • Visiting a local service and meeting staff and patients
  • Meeting with patient groups
  • Asking the HSSD to clarify intentions with regard to rehab services
  • Speaking up for quality rehabilitation in the States.

All candidates who sign up to support #backingrehab will receive further information on the value of rehabilitation.

Candidates on twitter will receive a retweet for tweeting ‘I’m #backingrehab’ in support.

Isn’t this an English initiative?

#BackignRehab is an initiative running in Guernsey, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in advance of elections this year.

We are not running the initiative in Jersey or the Isle of Man (which are also covered by the CSP) because there are no elections in Jersey and those on the Isle of Man are for bodies without a health remit.

Why isn’t there a CSP press campaign on rehab in Guernsey?

Our focus is engaging with candidates, as those of you elected will be key decision makers after the election. We have a range of public facing promotions and campaigns which we will be engaging the media in Guernsey on later this year.

If you’d like further information please contact yeldhamr@csp.org.uk